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Carlton defeated Richmond by 17 points - Princes Park.

Round 10, 1982

Carlton3.6247.125410.157518.16124
Richmond2.3158.45213.78516.11107
Venue: Princes ParkDate: Saturday May 29, 1982
Result: Win by 17 pointsUmpires: Robinson and Sawers Crowd: 35,261 Receipts; $63,880
Goalkickers: P.McConville 4, W.Johnston 3, R.Ashman 3, M.Fitzpatrick 2, G.Wells 1, P.Bosustow 1, P.Maylin 1, J.Buckley 1, D.Glascott 1, A.Marcou 1.
Best; P.Maylin, J.Buckley, K.Hunter, P.McConville, W.Jones, M.Fitzpatrick, V.Perovic, R.Ashman, R.Austin, D.Glascott.
Reports: Nil Injuries: P.Maylin (cramp), K.Hunter (cramp), S.Easton (knee)











Game Review

Carlton utility Phil Maylin played a magnificent game against bitter rivals Richmond on Saturday. The former South Australian is having a great season and his display against the Tigers was a good example of confident play, even under intense pressure. - Inside Football Player of the Year.


Richmond did well to lead Carlton until early in the last quarter but the Blues simply moved the premiership further from Richmond's grasp with one of the most amazing bursts of football that demoralises sides. Carlton's six goals in 10 minutes killed Richmond but the Blues do just that almost every week. Ask Hawthorn, Geelong, Collingwood or the Swans. Richmond coach, Francis Bourke hinted after the match that he believed he had a few players really down on form and that the next clash between these two football giants would be a different story. Bourke might be whistling in the wind. If Richmond had a few players down on Saturday, the Blues had star players well and truly in the horrors.

When players like Bruce Doull and Peter Bosustow fumble, you know that Carlton is not playing 100 percent efficiency. Some Tiger supporters claimed after the match that the Blues funbled because of the pressure applied by the Richmond players. That is nonsense. The Tigers pressure certainly was fierce but it is a mere myth that Carlton falters under pressure. It might have been true more than five years ago, but it no longer applies and those who believe Carlton is suspect had better look at the 1979 and 1981 premierships. If further proof is needed, take a look at the last quarter of Saturday's Richmond clash. The Blues had been hit with everything but an Argentine missle but still managed that superb last quarter. - Jim Main Inside Football.


Saturday's Carlton - Richmond match at Princes Park was like a final. It had all the atmosphere and pressure of a game in September. There was a lot of physical contact and right throughout it was nip and tuck. Defensive football was more the order of the day rather than attacking because both sides were desperate to contain the opposition and thereby grab the vital four premiership points. In the final analysis Carlton was the better side on the day. The six goal burst at the start of the last quarter sealed the game for the Blues. Supporters of both sides would have gone away from the match confident their team could win the return match in August. I know that we're looking forward to that meeting. - Geoff Raines Inside Football.


My opponent last Saturday, Carlton's David Glascott, is a real star of the future. He is really enthusiastic about his game and gives it his best shot. Today's style of football demands a lot of running - and that's where David excells. He runs all day and covers plenty of territory. In many respects he's similar to former Carlton wing great Bryan Quirk. No doubt the Blues will be hoping he follows the same path as Quirk who was an extremely consistent player during the late 1960's and early 1970's. Carlton's other winger on Saturday Frank Marchesani, also caught my eye. There was plenty of publicity surrounding Frank's move to Carlton from Fitzroy last season and he took a while to settle in. But it seems he's right back to his best now. Tall, quick wingers with plenty of stamina like Frank are vital players in any side. - Geoff Raines Inside Football.


''Tigers and Blues
Somehow, even at this stage, the Premiership race seems to be between those great rivals, Richmond and Carlton yet again. What great clubs they have been since 1967! Their fortunes have followed similar patterns, both clubs recruiting top coaches in 1965. Carlton gained the services of Ron Barassi in that era, a very emotional and publicised move for him and a basis of future success for the Blues. Richmond gained the late Len Smith, a gentleman and a scholar of football, his ideas forming a base for the Tigers, so successfully carried on by Tom Hafey, until he left for Collingwood in 1977. Carlton premierships followed in 1968, 1970, 1972 (against Richmond), 1979 and 1981. Richmond premierships began in 1967 after a 23 year drought and followed in 1969, 1973 (both against Carlton), 1974 and 1980.

Even their brands of footy have shown a certain similarity, Carlton leaning perhaps towards the skill area, Richmond tending to be tougher. But both now, are encroaching into the others strengths. Carlton, this season, has an explosive quality about it, an ability to score quickly by an intensity of effort that rises above the normal level expected. Parkin apparentally, made an emotional plea to the Blues last week, an interesting tactic, but a tactic born of awareness and confidence that they were able to do it. One just doesn't use this approach unless player capability is there. No doubt, Parkin is aware of this awesome potential in his players and has used the appropriate trigger at the right time. They are managing to cover the loss of real key forwards by the fantastic quickness of Johnston, Ashman and Marcou and the agility and danger of players like Bosustow and McConville.

Fitzpatrick's occassional forays up forward are usually productive and his unselfish play complements his smaller players. It is an interesting forward line set-up, most unconventional in that the six players on the forward line appear to wander around pretty much as they like, getting away from the conventional positioning. It sure works for them.... they work as a unit and work unselfishly to get the score on the board. The backline is still very good - Southby and Doull are ageless and Austin and Hunter give a nice blend of brillance and consistency.

Richmond is more predictable in its approach to the game and in its approach to goals also. The Tigers, too have brillant and flashy players - Raines, Rioli, Rowlings, Bartlett and Wiley provide class. Toughness and reliability are provided by the likes of Welsh, Malthouse, Keane and Jess, and, unlike Carlton they have key forwards to burn. Cloke, as ever, remains as the central figure but Taylor emerges as a top forward with Roach already proven. The Tigers kick shorter than they used to but still bomb the ball up forward for these bigger players to have first crack at it. Already, their next clash on the MCG looms as being a great game, predictably, perhaps, the decider as to who gains the top spot.

They will clash again in the Finals and I think that we have exciting games in store for us. It may seem premature to single out these two teams but, to me, the other teams will need to improve to be able to mix it with them. To me, the Blues and the Tigers are the teams to beat. - Barry Richardson Inside Football''


Carlton powered home to kick 9.0 to Richmond's 1.4 after trailing the Tigers by 16 points late in the third term. Val Perovic, Phil Maylin and Rod Ashman were outstanding for the Blues while Robert Wiley and Barry Rowlings were Richmond's best. - Football Record.


Team


B: 37 Wayne Harmes 20 Geoff Southby (vc) 9 Ken Hunter
HB: 22 Robbert Klomp 15 Val Perovic 11 Bruce Doull
C: 13 Phil Maylin 7 Wayne Johnston 32 David Glascott
HF: 4 Peter Bosustow 31 Steve Easton 25 Frank Marchesani
F: 3 Mike Fitzpatrick (c) 33 Peter McConville 16 Jim Buckley
Ruck: 2 Warren 'Wow' Jones 1 Greg Wells 14 Rod Ashman
Interchange: 21 Rod Austin 34 Alex Marcou
Coach: David Parkin


Milestones

Debut and only game (Carlton): Steve Easton


Round 9 | Round 11

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